Posts Tagged ‘città’

Sustainable Residential Design: Using Low-Impact Materials

mercoledì, aprile 14th, 2010

ASLA created a new online resource guide on using low-impact materials in sustainable residential landscape architecture. The guide contains lists of organizations, research, concepts and projects related to plants and sustainable landscape architecture, and includes sections on: permeable materials, certified woods, reclaimed and recycled local materials, recycled content, reflective materials, and adhesives, paints, coatings and sealants. Developed for students and professionals, the resource guide contains recent reports and projects from leading U.S. and international organizations, academics, and design firms.

This sustainable residential design resource guide is the third in a new four part series. See earlier guides in the sustainable residential design series: increasing energy efficiency,  improving water efficiency and maximizing the benefits of plants

The guide is separated into five sections:

  • Permeable Materials
  • Certified Woods
  • Reclaimed and Recycled Local Materials
  • Recycled Content
  • Reflective Materials
  • Adhesives, Paints, Coatings and Sealants

As an example, the section on “permeable materials” includes Chicago’s Green Alley handbook, as well as studies from the U.S. EPA and city of Portland on using permeable pavements to manage stormwater. There are also links to projects that have successfully incorporated these concepts in a residential context.

The Living Building Challenge

mercoledì, aprile 14th, 2010

Metropolis magazine wrote about the Omega Institute of Sustainable Living in Rhinebeck, New York, one of the world’s greenest buildings. According to Metropolis, the institute creates its own energy through on-site geothermal and solar systems, and uses local, non-toxic materials – “there’s virtually no PVC, lead, or mercury to speak of.” The building was created using the International Living Building Institute’s living building standard. Certified living buildings must consume zero energy and water, consist of non-toxic materials, restore habitat, and produce food (all of these are actually required). 

One of the more interesting features is the building’s “eco machine,” a system that clearly demonstrates for visitors how plants and fish remove human waste from water. The system was described as “a self-contained sewage system that mimics nature’s self-corrective principles by freeing plants, bacteria, micro-organisms, algae, and fish to feast on human waste, thus purify-ing it, much as a stream cleanses its own ecosystem.”

How to Expand Urban Agriculture

mercoledì, aprile 14th, 2010

The National Building Museum’s well-known “For the Greener Good” series featured a panel on urban agriculture, including Josh Viertel, President, Slow Food USA, Liz Falk, Director and co-Founder, Washington D.C.-based Common Good City Farm, and Steve Cohen, food policy and programs, City of Portland’s Bureau of Planning and Sustainability. The panel was moderated by Allison Arieff, Food and Shelter Ambassador, GOOD and “By Design” columnist, The New York Times.  

Chase Rynd, Executive Director, National Building Museum, framed the discussion by saying how and where we produce food has an enormous ecological impact. ”How we produce, transport, and store food has a huge impact. Food is directly related to the built environment.” Because of industrial food systems, people are losing their connection with nature. Bringing vegetable gardens back to communities, shortening food transportation times (and lowering the environmental costs of food transportation), can help improve the urban environment and make communities more engaging and “aesthetically pleasing.”

Gilberto Esparza’s Plant Robot

mercoledì, aprile 14th, 2010

Iconeye magazine wrote about Mexican artist Gilberto Esparza’s plant robot, a roving art installation. Called “Nomadic Plant,” the robot is part of an exhibition organized by LABoral Gallery in Asturias, Spain. Iconeye says the project is inspired by ”natural processes whereby plants adapt to hostile environments and colonise new territories.” The nomadic plant is autonomous and leads an ”unthreatening existence,” living off industrial waste.

Esparza told Iconeye: ”Nowadays robots are a waste of energy: they dance and they move all the time.” To make his plant robot self-sufficient but also productive, he designed it so it runs on bacteria found in waste. “When these microorganisms need nourishment the machine seeks out dirty water, which is then decomposed to create energy; any surplus is used to emit a noise and sustain plants carried on its back. The machine and plants becomes co-dependent.”

Iconeye says Esparza has long explored the relationship between organisms and systems. “In a previous project, Urban Parasites, creatures made from recycled electronic goods infested urban environments, feeding of a city’s electricity and telephone wires.”

pick up america

mercoledì, aprile 14th, 2010

On January 1st, a new fee was imposed on bags in the District of Columbia. Since then, pretty much anyone who shops or eats in the Nation’s capital has had to ask themselves if they really need a bag (or 5). The Anacostia River Cleanup and Protection Act charges five cents for each paper or plastic bag given out by businesses selling food or alcohol. The business gets to keep a penny (or two if they offer a discount to those who bring their own bag). The monetary motivation is fairly negligable — even someone as poor as I can afford to drop a nickel here and there. But when the cashier at the grocery store asks if you want a bag and explains why you may want to reconsider, it forces you to actually consider whether or not the bag is necessary.

As a waiter in a DC restaurant, sometimes I box-up leftovers for customers. “Would you like a bag?” I inquire, as I give them the box. Yesterday, the two ladies at the table said yes, but reconsidered after I mentioned the five cent fee. They left the restaurant — box in hand. 

On January 1st, a new fee was imposed on bags in the District of Columbia. Since then, pretty much anyone who shops or eats in the Nation’s capital has had to ask themselves if they really need a bag (or 5). The Anacostia River Cleanup and Protection Act charges five cents for each paper or plastic bag given out by businesses selling food or alcohol. The business gets to keep a penny (or two if they offer a discount to those who bring their own bag). The monetary motivation is fairly negligable — even someone as poor as I can afford to drop a nickel here and there. But when the cashier at the grocery store asks if you want a bag and explains why you may want to reconsider, it forces you to actually consider whether or not the bag is necessary.

As a waiter in a DC restaurant, sometimes I box-up leftovers for customers. “Would you like a bag?” I inquire, as I give them the box. Yesterday, the two ladies at the table said yes, but reconsidered after I mentioned the five cent fee. They left the restaurant — box in hand.

rifiuti di gomma

martedì, aprile 13th, 2010

si uttilizza prodotto speciale per migliorare situazione di rifiuti di gomma che e difficilissimo da pulire

Mappper

martedì, aprile 13th, 2010

Mappper è un’applicazione che consente di creare e condividere diari di viaggio interattivi e georeferenziali. In ogni viaggio creato si possono segnare le varie tappe, inserire delle foto che grazie al GPS vengono automaticamente associata alla posizione nella quale sono state scattate, o delle note, in modo da ricordarci di un particolare evento o situazione. Tramandiamo a noi stessi che in un preciso giorno siamo stati in quel preciso punto!

Tale diario di viaggio può essere poi pubblicato in modo da condividerlo con gli altri utenti di Mapper oppure con i propri amici che in questo modo possono seguirci in real-time e conoscere tutte le nostre mappe e i luoghi visitati.

Clicca per vedere il video

Baby Equipment Rental

martedì, aprile 13th, 2010

Littleluggage è un servizio presente a San Francisco che offre la possibilità di noleggiare attrezzature per bambini ai turisti che visitano la città.

Potrebbe essere interessante pensare a quelle persone che rimangono a Milano soltanto per determinati periodi di tempo (es. studenti erasmus) cui offrire la possibilità di noleggiare dei prodotti piuttosto che acquistarli.

The fun theory

martedì, aprile 13th, 2010

Com’è possibile cambiare le cattive abitudini delle persone? Com’è possibile rendere le persone più attente e rispettose dell’ambiente?

Ci ha pensato Volkswagen con un’iniziativa assolutamente divertente e coinvolgente: The Fun Theory.

Una serie di installazioni volte a sensibilizzare le persone su diversi argomenti quali la raccolta differenziata, il risparmio energetico, il rispetto per l’ambiente, la salute…tutto in un modo che, lo vedrete dai video, appassiona e diverte, dai più piccoli ai più grandi, e che ovviamente sensibilizza!

Tra i video più belli consiglio Piano Stairs relativo all’utilizzo delle scale al posto delle scale mobili per stimolare le persone al movimento. Senza installazione erano pochissime le persone che sceglievano le scale invece delle più “comode” scale mobili. Fin quando un gruppo creativo ha installato sui gradini delle scale una sorta di maxi-pianoforte perfettamente funzionante con tanto di tasti bianchi e neri. Ogni gradino un tasto e ovviamente una nota!

Inutile dire quanto l’attenzione delle persone sia traslata verso questa installazione e praticamente tutti hanno deciso di utilizzare le scale e creare le proprie melodie.

L’altra iniziativa è nota come  “Il cestino più profondo del mondo“, e riguarda appunto un cestino aparentemente profondissimo che ha incuriosito così tante persone e bambini (soprattutto) che in pochi minuti sono scomparse tutte le cartacce ed i rifiuti da un intero parco.

Video_piano stairs

Video_il cestino più profondo del mondo

Sul sito The Fun Theory ne trovate molti altri

Mezzi di trasporto individuale in città proposte dalla SEGWAY

lunedì, aprile 12th, 2010

Si tratta di mezzi di trasporto elettrico  individuale a due ruote per spostarsi in città (uno dei progetti della SEGWAY). In corrispondenza ai spostamenti sulle lunghe o corte distanze
vengono proposte P.U.M.A. (Personal Urban Mobility & Accessibility) e PT (Personal Transpo). L’ultimo link da la possibilità di vedere se il PT può essere adattato all’esigenze del utente in mobilità.